From: Daniel Fetchinson on
>>>> I'm pleased to announce the release of inflect.py v0.1.8, a module that
>>>> correctly generates:
>>>>
>>>> * the plural of singular nouns and verbs
>>>> * the singular of plural nouns
>>>> * ordinals
>>>> * indefinite articles
>>>> * present participles
>>>> * and converts numbers to words
>>>
>>> Which languages does it support? If the answer is what I expect it is,
>>
>> It is. Most of the time, when people forget to say what they are talking
>> about, assuming that they are either US-Americans or Windows users will
>> hit
>> the nail on the head.
>
> And most of the time, when people are bitching about US-Americans,
> assuming that they are Europeans will hit the nail on the head :)

In this case, I actually should modify the above to: when people are
bitching about an English speaker they don't like for some reason and
they automatically think that said person must be US-American when in
fact he/she is Australian (or British or South African or something
else), assuming that they are Europeans will hit the nail on the head
:)

Duck-and-run-even-faster-ly yours,
Daniel



--
Psss, psss, put it down! - http://www.cafepress.com/putitdown
From: MRAB on
Paul wrote:
>> Thomas Jollans, 15.07.2010 18:41:
>
>>> On 07/15/2010 01:00 PM, Paul wrote:
>>>> I'm pleased to announce the release of inflect.py v0.1.8, a module
>>>> that correctly generates:
>
>>>> * the plural of singular nouns and verbs
>>>> * the singular of plural nouns
>>>> * ordinals
>>>> * indefinite articles
>>>> * present participles
>>>> * and converts numbers to words
>
>>> Which languages does it support? If the answer is what I expect it
>>> is,
>
>> It is. Most of the time, when people forget to say what they are
>> talking about, assuming that they are either US-Americans or Windows
>> users will hit the nail on the head.
>
>> Still, a pretty nice tool, I'd say.
>
>>> did you design the module with multilingualism in mind?
>
>> Just look at the code, it consists almost exclusively of long lists
>> of words. Multilingualism clearly wasn't a design goal.
>
>> Stefan
>
> The module is based upon a Perl module that has been around for about
> ten years. I did a line by line translation of the Perl code into
> Python, got that working and am now slowly redesigning the code. I am
> currently removing many of the regular expressions, which makes the
> code many times faster (and clearer, I think).
>
> The code alternates between applying rules and using lists of words.
> The author of the original Perl code, Damian Conway, wrote an academic
> paper on the approach taken.
> http://www.csse.monash.edu.au/~damian/papers/HTML/Plurals.html
>
> A future goal is to have this work in a way that is far more pluggable
> and so be applicable to other languages. But at the moment I'm happy
> to have got it working.
>
> I'm pretty sure that if Damian was writing this from scratch today he
> would design it differently. However, I had existing Perl code that
> worked, so I would rather start with that, get it working in Python
> and covered by tests. Then I can improve the design with the safety of
> test coverage.
>
> The Perl version is called Lingua::EN::Inflect, so was more explicit
> about being for English in its naming and there are other Perl
> Lingua::XX::Inflects for other languages. But my lack of mentioning
> English in the announcement was an oversight. Both the Perl author and
> I are Australian, and so the modules support British English over
> American English where necessary, with the Oxford English Dictionary
> as our guide.
>
Could I suggest that you also change the method names to something
clearer?
From: Stefan Behnel on
Daniel Fetchinson, 16.07.2010 17:29:
>>>>> I'm pleased to announce the release of inflect.py v0.1.8, a module that
>>>>> correctly generates:
>>>>>
>>>>> * the plural of singular nouns and verbs
>>>>> * the singular of plural nouns
>>>>> * ordinals
>>>>> * indefinite articles
>>>>> * present participles
>>>>> * and converts numbers to words
>>>>
>>>> Which languages does it support? If the answer is what I expect it is,
>>>
>>> It is. Most of the time, when people forget to say what they are talking
>>> about, assuming that they are either US-Americans or Windows users will
>>> hit the nail on the head.
>>
>> And most of the time, when people are bitching about US-Americans,
>> assuming that they are Europeans will hit the nail on the head :)
>
> In this case, I actually should modify the above to: when people are
> bitching about an English speaker they don't like for some reason and
> they automatically think that said person must be US-American when in
> fact he/she is Australian (or British or South African or something
> else), assuming that they are Europeans will hit the nail on the head
> :)

:) I'm happy to see that the good old clich├ęs still work in all directions.
Makes the world so easy.

Stefan