From: Steven D'Aprano on
On Mon, 12 Jul 2010 02:40:07 +0000, Steven D'Aprano wrote:

> On Mon, 12 Jul 2010 01:31:14 +0100, Mark Lawrence wrote:
>
>> Well said Steven, or is it Stephen, or Stephan, or Stefen, or what?
>
> For some reason, when I answer the phone and say "Hello, Steven
> speaking?" I often get called Peter.

Er, without the question mark.

--
Steven
From: Terry Reedy on
On 7/11/2010 3:26 AM, rantingrick wrote:
>
> Another source of asininity seems to be the naming conventions of the
> Python language proper! True/False start with an upper case and i
> applaud this. However str, list, tuple, int, float --need i go
> on...?-- start with lowercase.

This is an anomaly, known to all long-time Pythoneers, due the the
history of Python. Before 2.2 and unification of types and classes as
new-style classes, those were all type constructor *functions*, not
class names. The idea of breaking most every serious Python program on
the planet by upper-casing them has been considered and so far rejected.

--
Terry Jan Reedy

From: Cameron Simpson on
On 12Jul2010 02:43, Steven D'Aprano <steve-REMOVE-THIS(a)cybersource.com.au> wrote:
| On Mon, 12 Jul 2010 02:40:07 +0000, Steven D'Aprano wrote:
| > On Mon, 12 Jul 2010 01:31:14 +0100, Mark Lawrence wrote:
| >> Well said Steven, or is it Stephen, or Stephan, or Stefen, or what?
| >
| > For some reason, when I answer the phone and say "Hello, Steven
| > speaking?" I often get called Peter.
|
| Er, without the question mark.

Ah, so you get differing results when you use the question mark?
Phonetic punctuation; Victor Borge would be proud.
--
Cameron Simpson <cs(a)zip.com.au> DoD#743
http://www.cskk.ezoshosting.com/cs/

A lot of people don't know the difference between a violin and a viola, so
I'll tell you. A viola burns longer. - Victor Borge
From: Jean-Michel Pichavant on
rantingrick wrote:
> On Jul 11, 3:03 am, "G´┐Żnther Dietrich" <gd.use...(a)spamfence.net>
> wrote:
>
>
>> So, it is not a disadvantage that the functions you listed above are
>> named in this way. In the contrary, it is an advantage, as it keeps
>> newcomers from using stupid variable names.
>>
>
> "int" for an Integer is stupid?
> "list" for a List is stupid?
> "str" for a String is stupid?
>
> What am i missing?
>
def func154():
int32 = 24
list18 = [int32, 14]
str14 = ""
for int89 in list18:
if int89 == int32 or int89 == 88:
str14 = "I am missing everything"
if str14:
print str14

>>> func154()
>>> "I am missing everything"


JM
From: Neil Cerutti on
On 2010-07-12, Steven D'Aprano <steve(a)REMOVE-THIS-cybersource.com.au> wrote:
> On Sun, 11 Jul 2010 01:30:36 -0700, rantingrick wrote:
>
>> On Jul 11, 3:03??am, "G??nther Dietrich" <gd.use...(a)spamfence.net> wrote:
>>
>>> So, it is not a disadvantage that the functions you listed above are
>>> named in this way. In the contrary, it is an advantage, as it keeps
>>> newcomers from using stupid variable names.
>>
>> "int" for an Integer is stupid?
>> "list" for a List is stupid?
>> "str" for a String is stupid?
>>
>> What am i missing?
>
> If you're going to use generic names, why type three or four letters when
> one will do?
>
> i, j, k, m, n, p, q for ints.
> L, a, b, x for lists
> s, t, a, b for strings.
>
> If you don't want to use generic names, then int, list, str are useless
> because they don't mean anything. You need something like:
>
> count_of_widgets
> list_of_widgets
> description

def map(function, list):
# etc.

It's a slight annoyance, nothing more.

In the data I deal with, I get annoyed at needing to write
student_id instead of id, but it's not a huge issue. The big
consolation is that Python really doesn't care if I happen to
shadow a builtin name that I've never heard of. I forget, and use
id as a variable all the time, and nothing bad happens to me,
because I don't need the builtin function.

To see a really odd example of a similar name clash, create a tab
separated values file with a header line starting with ID (I get
lots of them in my work), and then open it with Excel (I don't
know which version has the most bizarre error message).

--
Neil Cerutti